Posted by: quiscus | November 6, 2012

November 6, 2012

1. “let me make one suggestion about how to comport yourself on this Election Day. Please refuse that infantile “I Voted!” sticker they hand you at the polls. You are, presumably, a functional, taxpaying adult who reads the newspaper and strives to form intelligent opinions about public affairs. You shouldn’t be caught walking around with a laudatory label on your shirt, like you’re a five-year-old kid who just went to the dentist, got the bubble-gum flavored fluoride and didn’t squirm.”

http://washingtonexaminer.com/election-2012-lets-hear-it-for-cynicism/article/2512636#.UJhb8cXA9uY

2. Remember, he who has the gold, rules.

“China Is Quietly Becoming Gold Superpower

World’s Top Gold Producer Holding Onto All of Its Gold

While Western central banks have frittered away their gold, China is quietly building up its reserves.

China is the world’s largest gold producer.

And yet – according to various sources – gold bullion brokers have not seen any gold coming from China. In other words, China is producing more gold than any other country, but isn’t exporting any of it. In addition, china is importing huge amounts of gold.

As such, China is quietly becoming a gold superpower.”

http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2012/11/china-becoming-gold-superpower.html

3. ” British Have Invaded Nine Out of Ten Countries

Britain has invaded all but 22 countries in the world in its long and colourful history, new research has found.

Every schoolboy used to know that at the height of the empire, almost a quarter of the atlas was coloured pink, showing the extent of British rule. But that oft recited fact dramatically understates the remarkable global reach achieved by this country.

A new study has found that at various times the British have invaded almost 90 per cent of the countries around the globe. The analysis of the histories of the almost 200 countries in the world found only 22 which have never experienced an invasion by the British.

Among this select group of nations are far-off destinations such as Guatemala, Tajikistan and the Marshall Islands, as well some slightly closer to home, such as Luxembourg.

Only a comparatively small proportion of the total in Mr Laycock’s list of invaded states actually formed an official part of the empire. The remainder have been included because the British were found to have achieved some sort of military presence in the territory – however transitory – either through force, the threat of force, negotiation or payment.

Incursions by British pirates, privateers or armed explorers have also been included, provided they were operating with the approval of their government. So, many countries which once formed part of the Spanish empire and seem to have little historical connection with the UK, such as Costa Rica, Ecuador and El Salvador, make the list because of the repeated raids they suffered from state-sanctioned British sailors.

Among some of the perhaps surprising entries on the list are:

* Cuba, where in 1741, a force under Admiral Edward Vernon stormed ashore at Guantánamo Bay. He renamed it Cumberland Bay, before being forced to withdraw in the face of hostile locals and an outbreak of disease among his men. Twenty one years later, Havana and a large part of the island fell to the British after a bloody siege, only to be handed back to the Spanish in 1763, along with another unlikely British possession, the Philippines, in exchange for Florida and Minorca.

*Iceland, invaded in 1940 by the British after the neutral nation refused to enter the war on the Allies side. The invasion force, of 745 marines, met with strong protest from the Iceland government, but no resistance.

* Vietnam, which has experienced repeated incursions by the British since the seventeenth century. The most recent – from 1945 to 1946 – saw the British fight a campaign for control of the country against communists, in a war that has been overshadowed by later conflicts involving first the French and then Americans.

The research covered the 192 other UN member states as well as the Vatican City and Kosovo, which are not member states, but are recognised by the UK government as independent states.

The earliest invasion launched from these islands was an incursion into Gaul – now France – at the end of the second century. Clodius Albinus led an army, thought to include many Britons, across the Channel in an attempt to seize the imperial throne. The force was defeated in 197 at Lyon. ”

http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article32946.htm

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